Market Curiosity: Exploring Markets And Systems

February 9, 2014

January Snippets

Filed under: Snippets — Jeff Fitzmyers @ 2:02 pm

Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better. — Albert Einstein

The difference between a rut and a grave is the depth. — Gerald Burrill

Blame is not for failure, it is for failing to help or ask for help. — Jorgen Vig Knudstorp, CEO of The Lego Group

It changes everything. Suddenly it becomes in my interest to be transparent on my real weaknesses, my real forecast, because I know I will not be blamed if I fail, but if I fail to help or ask for help. — Yves Morieux: As work gets more complex, 6 rules to simplify

  • Understand what other people do.
  • Reinforce the integrators.
  • Expand the amount of power available.
  • Increase the need for reciprocity.
  • Expose employees to the shadow of the future.
  • Place blame on the uncooperative.

Things are either of the light (win-win), or the not light. Gray is in the manifestation, not the decision. — me

There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it. — Edith Wharton

Time is the ultimate tester (and breaker) of all things – as such, time equates to volatility. Mother Nature is the master of incremental advancement (biological and societal evolution) through multi-dimensional long run trial and error (serendipitous random tinkering).

Many “Soviet-Harvard” type errors come via disregard of time gaps – the delayed distribution of hidden costs and consequences (mistaking absence of evidence for evidence of absence). Those who suffer from neomania – love of the new – arrogantly assume we can improve on designs we don’t truly understand, even when nature has taken centuries, or even millennia, to perfect what clearly works.

Because existence is such a non-linear phenomenon – e.g. our hunter gatherer ancestors did not get an “average” or “balanced” nutritional intake each day, but rather feasted on some occasions and fasted on others – it bears out that Mother Nature (and thus our ancient biological systems) have intrinsically adapted to this nonlinearity, and even found ways to benefit from it (moderate level stressors strengthen the bones and muscles, random fluctuations in air pressure intake can benefit the lungs etc.).

The principle of “via negativa” suggests that, in terms of taking action, subtraction often trumps addition because it is so hard to improve on nature’s time-tested original (without dilutive side effects). Infant mortality and life-saving surgery aside, the simple exhortation to stop smoking (give up cigarettes) has had more positive health impact than virtually all “modern medicine” advances of the 20th century. — Embrace Optionality and Don’t Drink Orange Juice: “Antifragile” Review (Taleb ond nature)

Uncertainty sucks! I found that “trying” to let go of attachment was too hard. So I gave up, which allowed peace to flow. Instead of fighting the attachment and pain of attachment, I thanked the attachment for illustrating: how much I cared, what I cared about, and that I was not all the way balanced in this area. — Me

How about some Rumi
– Whatever you are seeking, is seeking you.
– Lovers don’t finally meet somewhere. They’re in each other all along.
– If the house of the world is dark, Love will find a way to create windows.
– As you live deeper in the heart, the mirror gets clearer and cleaner.
– Wherever you stand, be the soul of that place.
– Stay in the spiritual fire. Let it cook you.
– Try something different. Surrender.

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: